Posts

Summary

Trai Cartwright is a 25-year industry veteran and a creative writing and business development specialist. She teaches, produces and writes screenplays and novels. While in Los Angeles, she was a screenwriter, independent film producer and story consultant, and development executive for HBO, Paramount Pictures, Universal Studios, and New Line Cinema.

She was the assistant director for Leonardo DiCaprio‘s online endeavors, and the manager for 20th Century Fox‘s Mobile Studios. Trai currently teaches creative writing, screenwriting, and producing for Western State Colorado University, Denver University, and CU Denver. Conferences, cons, and one-on-one as a development and story editor. She's the screenwriter of Secret Ellington, and the producer of a docu-webseries called Hidden Tigers, and a short film called Sundown Road.

Show Notes

[1:20] Trai’s background

[2:36] Growing up as a child writer and storyteller

[3:09] Trai's introduction to screenwriting, film, theatre, and community at NYU

[4:52] The discovery that crew work was not her calling

[6:17] Trai's first studio job at Orion Pictures, Sharon Bidal, and Wordperfect

[7:50] Lessons obtained (in hindsight) about education

[9:59] The film industry and the adventurous spirit

[11:50] Figuring out how you want to work

[12:48] The value of being a PA

[13:22] How Trai earned her money

[16:29] Decompressing in Fort Collins

[18:02] Doing time in Chicago, and a fortuitous encounter in a pool hall

[19:50] Gary Marshall, Northwestern University, and Avid editing systems

[21:38] The Honeymoon Period, and learning when to call the fire department

[25:43] Heading to LA with Dawn Wildsmith, Surf Nazis Must Die, and being a PA in LA

[32:19] How temping changed Trai's life

[33:54] Working in the industry, and The Irv Scheckter Company

[36:12] Adventures with Prelude Pictures

[38:24] Lost in Space in Marilyn Monroe's old dressing room at Paramount Pictures

[39:33] VP of Creative Services and Peter Saphier

[41:11] Side work with writers

[42:47] Working remotely as a viable option in the film industry

[44:25] Amassing skills as a crew person in Colorado

[45:24] The need to go where the opportunities are

[48:00] Filmmaking as a career vs. a hobby/project

[49:30] 10,000 hours to expertise, 5,000 hours to competence

[50:30] Ambition vs. heart – for writers, directors and producers

[51:47] Having the persistence and be willing to truly commit in the film industry

[53:15] Savoring the brilliant moments and learning to fall

[55:21] Living in Colorado while working in the industry

[56:55] Building businesses in Colorado vs. California

[59:40] Working in Colorado

[1:01:22] The coup at Creative Artists Agency

[1:04:57] Teaching the business of show business

[1:06:37] The value of education

[1:08:00] Never stop learning

[1:09:45] Vet your educators in order to build yourself a community

[1:12:27] Leaving LA

[1:17:36] Creativity defined

[1:18:37] Marriage and creative people

[1:20:20] Shifting perspectives in order to succeed and be happy

[1:23:03] Pulling back in order to move forward, and lift other people up

[1:27:20] Creating a Master's Program with Denver Media Professionals

[1:28:28] Women in Film and Media in Colorado (WIFMCO)

[1:32:00] Find an organization that resonates with you, and become a part of it

[1:34:25] All the cool things that WIFMCO does

[1:37:05] Giving back and investing within the Colorado film and media industry

[1:40:16] The lesson learned over the last year

[1:42:11] The biggest life lesson

[1:44:40] Advice for aspiring screenwriters

Links and resources

 

Be sure to check out podcasts with other great guests in the film and media industry on our DMP Podcast Page!

Summary

Tom Malloy is an actor, writer, and producer, a passionate and driven filmmaker committed to telling compelling stories with commercial appeal. Many of these projects are developed through the production company he founded in 2005, Trick Candle Productions.

In 2016, Tom co-founded the sales and distribution company called Glass House Distribution. Glass House maintains a presence in all the major film markets including AFM, EFM, TIFF, MITcon, and Cannes, and has grown from two people to a seven-person operation, recently adding a TV-series department.

Tom's unique ability to both write projects and raise funding for them has been a primary factor in the success of the company. In fact, Tom shared his expertise on the subject in the best-selling book about independent film financing called Bankroll. In 2019, Tom co-founded Filmmaking Stuff HQ, which is one of the premiere online training platforms for filmmakers.

Show Notes

[1:37] Dividing time between LA and upstate New York

[2:48] How Tom got into the film business

[4:45] How his various roles all work together

[6:33] Motivational speaking and getting started in fundraising

[8:50] Creating the perfect pitch

[10:53] Improving on earlier pitches

[12:18] The average day of a producer

[14:29] Juggling multiple projects

[16:14] The advantages of partnering up and building your network

[17:50] Moving from working with friends to working with pro talent

[19:26] The difference between a producer and a fundraiser

[21:47] Defining different types of producers

[23:57] Tom's take on crowdfunding

[25:41] Investors motivated by ROI vs. vested interest

[29:12] What kind of package do filmmaker's need to pitch a studio?

[31:35] Movie Plan Pro

[33:01] The merits of various funding sources

[35:19] What do producers take into account when producing a first-time director's script?

[38:13] How do find producers and investors?

[41:36] How to approach pitching single projects versus a slate of projects

[43:07] Pitching for the hot genre

[44:37] How does an aspiring filmmaker turn this passion into a business?

[46:45] How much does it cost to go to a film market?

[48:29] Investing in your career

[49:42] How do you keep the executive producers/backers out of the creative process?

[51:13] How do you figure the budget of how much you need to raise for a film?

[52:30] Quick tips, the most effective strategy, and advice for first-time fundraisers

[55:12] How do you know you have a great script?

[57:42] Advertising for readers

[58:10] What is involved in the pre-production development?

[59:30] Bankroll Your Film

[1:05:33] “Stay out of the movie business!”

 

Links and resources

 

Be sure to check out podcasts with other great guests in the film and media industry on our DMP Podcast Page!

Summary

Sara Elizabeth Timmins established Life Out Loud Films in 2008 to create quality, inspiring, impactful films that champion women. Her films have been seen in theaters, the Hallmark Channel, Starz, Showtime, and internationally. She's worked with talented actors such as Jane Seymour, Ellen Burstyn, Chris Cooper, Josh Lucas, Mackenzie Foy, and writers like NY Times best-selling author David Baldacci. Most recently, she field produced an HBO docuseries for Mark Wahlberg‘s company and is in development on several feature films and a series. She also works as a consultant for both films and filmmakers and has produced national campaigns for companies such as Meyer Natural Foods & Laura's Lean.

Sara Elizabeth believes she has a responsibility through film to spark conversations that spark action, that spark change, and remains dedicated to encouraging the work of talented writers – and championing female leaders behind the camera while providing strong female roles in front of it. She is a member of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, SAG, both DGA– and PGA-eligible, and was a qualified independent producer for NBCUniversal/IFTA.

Show Notes

[1:39] Sarah's Background

  • Grew up in Warren, Ohio
  • Attended Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Was always very involved in front of the camera and theatre until graduation
  • Discovered her love of film while volunteering her time on the production of Tattered Angel with Lynda Carter
  • Moved to LA for 7 years producing for others
  • In 2008 she decided to start her own company, Life Out Loud Films
  • Did a lot of work in Southwest Virginia, now works out of Atlanta

[4:06] The impact that working in Atlanta has on Sara Elizabeth's business

[6:44] How does a market make its own work when incentives are small?

[10:26] The production value of working in rural communities and locations

[12:29] What About Bob? and how to give back to the community as a filmmaker

[13:50] How Life Out Loud Films dealt with the economic downturn of 2008

[18:44] Braveheart and finding the proper perspective

[21:21] Finding the balance between business and creativity

[24:35] How constraints of business can be a boon to filmmakers

[25:54] How Sara Elizabeth fosters quality, inspiration, and impact to produce films that champion women

[30:21] Crew building inclusive sets and finding a balance

[34:13] A day in the life as both a creative director and producer

[36:41] Sara Elizabeth's workshops, and working with the assets you have

[42:47] Budget ranges and saleability

[45:36] The merits of attaching recognizable talent to smaller-budget films

[50:14] Ways to sabotage your film

[53:06] Some of the realities of commercial and theatrical distribution

[55:50] Walking the fine budget line with your cast and crew

[59:06] The feasibility of involving SAG and union workers in low budget films

[1:05:16] Fundraising money as an independent filmmaker

[1:14:18] The quality of investors and why they invest

[1:19:37] Developing a community model for filmmaking projects

[1:21:35] What you should have in-hand when approaching investors

[1:23:04] How much a professional-sounding pitch can cost you

[1:27:11] Consulting services can be a source of invaluable shortcuts

[1:31:20] Finding funds to put towards professionals to elevate your project to the next level

[1:33:37] Sara Elizabeth's advice to young filmmakers

Links and Resources

  • View Sara Elizabeth's credits on IMDB
  • Visit Life Out Loud Films
  • View the Life Out Loud Films Demo Reel
  • Connect with Sara Elizabeth and Life Out Loud Films on Instagram and Facebook
  • Keep an eye out for a new program coming soon: No Film School, No Trust Fund, No Problem!

 

Be sure to check out podcasts with other great guests in the film and media industry on our DMP Podcast Page!